Self-Help Book Recommendations

Self-Help Book Recommendations

When quarantine began, it seemed like the perfect vacation, an escape from school, work, and the majority of day-to-day responsibilities. As I’m sure most teens did, I spent all my free time on social media. But the hours and hours of scrolling Tik Tok, Instagram, and Twitter quickly became overdone. Quarantine was no longer a two-week vacation but a long-term change, and I realized I needed a more productive hobby than liking posts. That is when I started reading, specifically self-help books. I, someone who used to hate reading, will now never be caught without a book in my hand. There is no better way to feel understood than to read someone go through the same challenges as you. There is no other way to feel encouraged than to read how others overcame similar obstacles because it means you can too. Below are the top three self-help books I’ve read and why you should read them too.

1. People Can’t Drive You Crazy If You Don’t Give Them The Keys

Overall Rating: 5

Dr. Mike Bechtle
Dr. Mike Bechtle

Author Dr. Mike Bechtle is a best-selling author of six books. He received a doctorate’s degree in communications from Arizona State. His goal is to teach people how to communicate in a way that builds strong relationships.

This book revolves around taking back control. Too many of us allow other’s words and actions to dictate how we feel without even realizing it. Letting one snarky comment steal our self-esteem or one slow driver ruin our day. Bechtle explains there will always be that one person who gets under your skin, and you can’t change them. But get this… you can change yourself. Honestly, certain chapters of this book left me speechless. It helped me understand how someone acts says everything about them and nothing about me. Read this book to learn a new perspective on relationships that will stop you from being a victim of other people’s craziness.

Quotes that stuck with me:

No matter how much energy and commitment we put into another person, we can’t assume there will be a happy ending.

No matter how painful the results of our past choices, they are behind us. 

We want a happy life but if we assume that means having uninterrupted positive emotions, we are setting ourselves up for disappointment.

Instead of trying to make the right choice, make a healthy choice and then make it right. 

When we have nothing left to give because hurtful things have sucked us dry, it’s OK.

2. 101 Essays That Will Change The Way You Think

Overall Rating: 5

Brianna West
Brianna West

Author Brianna West is a writer and poet. She is best known for her prolific work on emotional intelligence.

This book is one of the thickest self-help books I’ve ever read. It is also my favorite book. There are 101 chapters debunking common thoughts and advocating for rare perspectives. All of the chapters are short and straight to the point, which helps facilitate learning. This book covers emotional intelligence, thriving in solitude, body image, cognitive biases, how to rogue intelligently, and so much more. There are also constant jokes making you feel like you are talking to a close, personal friend. However, this won’t stop you from feeling attacked when West calls out certain habits you might do.

Quotes that stuck with me:

Logic helps you make decisions for the person you hope to be; passion helps you make decisions for the person you are or were.

I had to learn that my expression did not need to be justified it is valid because I am a valid human being, the same as you and everybody else.

The opposite of pain isn’t joy its acceptance.

Nothing is as it is, it is as you are. 

If you must walk out of something, learn to do so gracefully, so the door won’t be locked if you need to walk back in.

3. Girl Wash Your Face

Overall Rating: 3

Rachel Hollis
Rachel Hollis

Rachel Hollis is an author, motivational speaker, and blogger. Her mission is to use the obstacles she’s faced in life to inspire others.

This book is a different style than the two I have previously reviewed. Rachel doesn’t directly give her readers advice but subtly does it as she recounts her life. However, this does not stop her readers from walking away with lessons. Rachel revolves each chapter around a lie and shares her experience believing it and how you can stop too. The only reason it got ⅗ stars is that I prefer self-help books that are purely advice instead of recounting a story.

Quotes that stuck with me:

We are doing pretty good – and pretty good is way better than trying to fake perfection any day of the week. 

You’re maybe so deeply inside the forest you can’t see the trees. 

I am still here because I didn’t allow the hard time to make me weak; I willed it to make me strong. 

Remember that – by an inch or a mile – forward momentum is the only requirement. 

Recognizing the lies we’ve come to accept about ourselves is the key to growing into a better version of ourselves.

I really hope one of these books spoke to you, and if not, I at least motivated you to find a self-help book that does. Reading other’s peoples perspective on life truly does change how you view your own. You develop a deeper understanding of growth and the different ways to acquire it. Reading self-help books changed me and, I know if you give it a chance, it will do the same for you. Well, enough chit-chat, I think it’s about time I get back to my book!

Alyssa Mullings
Alyssa Mullings

Alyssa Mullings is a senior at the Medical Academy for Science and Technology at Homestead. Her love for writing developed as she took AP Seminar and AP Language and Composition. She is a full-time writer for The Caduceus Times, the school’s newspaper, where she focuses on feature articles and personal columns. When she’s not writing, you can find her reading self-improvement books or spending time with her family.